USS Delaware (SSN 791) will join a long line of service with distinction-

  • USS Delaware (1776), was a 24-gun frigate built in 1776 and captured by the British in 1777
  • USS Delaware (1798), was a 20-gun ship purchased in 1798
  • USS Delaware (1820), was a 74-gun ship of the line, launched in 1820 and burned in 1861
  • USS Delaware (1861), was a side-wheel steamer built in 1861 and decommissioned in 1865
  • USS Delaware (1866), was a screw steamer renamed from Piscataqua in 1869
  • USS Delaware (BB-28), was a battleship commissioned in 1910 and scrapped in 1924
  • SP-467 (later AT-5S and YT-111) served in the Navy from 1917 to 1923. Although officially known as SP-467, she was erroneously listed under her merchant name of Delaware on various occasions.

Milestones

Keel Laying-April 30, 2016
Christening  Fall 2018

Descriptions and Service Histories of Naval Ships and Vessels that Carried the Name “Delaware” 1775-1924

Delaware

Continental Navy, American War of Independence

Construction:

  • Authorized by Congress in 1775
  • Built by Warwick Coates of Philadelphia
  • Laid down: 1776
  • Launched July 12, 1776
  • Commissioned 1777

Dimensions:

  • Length: 119’
  • Beam: 32’ 10”
  • Displacement: 563  tons

Propulsion: Square Rigged Sails

Armament: 28 guns: 12- and 6-Pounder Long Guns

Crew Compliment: Unknown

Service History:

  • Ready for sea service by March 30, 1777
  • Received orders to operate against British forces
  • Led American vessels in engagement with British vessels off Bombay Hook, Delaware
  • Participated in the defense of the Delaware during the Philadelphia Campaign in the fall of 1777
  • Grounded in Delaware River and surrendered to British forces; Taken in to Royal Navy service, and renamed His Majesties Armed Ship Delaware and participated in Royal Navy operations in the Delaware River during the late autumn and early winter of 1777
  • Service unknown from 1778-1782
  • Sold out of service in 1783

Delaware

Pennsylvania State Navy, American War for Independence 

Construction: Unknown

Dimensions: Unknown

Propulsion: Unknown

Armament: Unknown

Crew Compliment: 40

Service History:

  • Received orders to operate against British forces in the Delaware River and Bay
  • Cruised off Cape May, NJ with American vessels
  • Participated in engagement with British forces off Bombay Hook, Delaware
  • Participated in the defense of the Delaware during the Philadelphia Campaign in the Autumn of 1777
  • Final disposition unknow

Delaware

Delaware State Navy, American War for Independence

Construction: Unknown

Dimensions: Unknown

Propulsion: Possibly consisted of combination of Square Rigged and Fore-and Aft Sails

Armament: 6-Pounder Long Guns

Crew Compliment: Unknown

Service History:

  • Vessel was purchased by Delaware State government for coastal defense and interdiction of Loyalist privateers and smugglers in late 1781to early 1782
  • Complete service history is unknown
  • Sold out of service in/by 1783

Delaware, ex-Hambugh Packet

United States Navy, Quasi-War with France

Construction:

  • Built in Philadelphia in 1794
  • Purchased by U.S. Navy on May 5, 1798
  • Commissioned June 1798

Dimensions:

  • Length: 94’ 9”
  • Beam: 28’
  • Displacement: 321 and 65/95 tons

Propulsion: Square Rigged

Armament: 24 guns: Sixteen (16) 9-Pounder Long Guns, Eight (8) 6-Pounder Long Guns

Crew Compliment: 180

Service History:

  • One of the first U.S. Navy vessels to get to sea during conflict, at sea on or before July 2, 1798
  • Cruised in the West Indies
  • Captured French privateer La Croyable off the Delaware Capes, this capture had the distinction of being the first enemy vessel taken by the U.S. Navy during this conflict
  • Assisted in the capture of French privateering vessels Sans Pareil, Jalouse, Le Marsouin, Le Renard and L’Ocean
  • Recaptured American vessels Cygnet and Jane
  • Sold out of service in Baltimore, Maryland in June 1801

U.S.S. Delaware

United States Navy, Squadron Service 

Construction:

  • Authorized by Congress April 29, 1816
  • Designed by William Doughty
  • Laid down in Norfolk, Virginia in August 1817
  • Launched October 21, 1820
  • Commissioned February 1828

Dimensions:

  • Length: 196’ 3”
  • Beam: 54’ 4”
  • Displacement: 2,633 tons

Propulsion: Square Rigged

Armament: 84 guns: Seventy-two (72) 32-Pounder Long Guns, Twelve (12) 8” Guns

Crew Compliment: 820

Service History:

  • Flagship of the Mediterranean Squadron 1828-1830
  • Laid up 1830-1833
  • Flagship of the Mediterranean Squadron 1833-1836
  • Laid up 1836-1841
  • Flagship of Brazil Station 1841-1843
  • Mediterranean Squadron 1843-1844
  • Laid up 1844-1861
  • Burned April 20, 1861 at Norfolk Navy Yard to prevent capture by Confederate forces

U.S.S. Delaware, ex-Virginia Dare

United States Navy, American Civil War, United States Revenue Cutter Service, Post-Civil War             

Construction:

  • Built in Wilmington, Delaware by Harlan
  • Acquired October 14, 1861
  • Commissioned 1861

Dimensions:

  • Length: 161’
  • Beam: 27’
  • Displacement: 357 tons (Burthen), iron hull

Propulsion: Side Wheels, 1 Beam Condensing Engine

Armament: Muzzle Loading Long Guns of Different Calibers

Crew Compliment: 57 / 65

Service History:

  • Part of North Atlantic Blockading Squadron
  • In 1862, participated in:
    • Landings at Roanoke Island, N.C.
    • Capture of Elizabeth City, N.C.
    • Expedition to Edenton, N.C.
    • Reconnaissance to Winton, N.C.
    • Chowan River, Capture of New Bern, N.C.
    • Reconnaissance in Neuse River
  • Involved in engagements at Dutch Gap, VA. and captured the Confederate vessels Lynnhaven, Zenith, Albermarle, Lion and unidentified steamer during 1864
  • Decommissioned March 26, 1865
  • Began further Federal service when vessel entered Revenue Cutter Service in 1865
  • Renamed Louis McLane in 1873
  • Sold out of service in 1903; Became merchant vessel Louis Dolive 

U.S.S. Delaware, ex-Piscataqua

United States Navy, Squadron Service

Construction:

  • Built at Portsmouth Navy Yard
  • Laid Down 1864
  • Launched June 11, 1866
  • Commissioned October 21, 1867

Dimensions:

  • Length: 336’ 6”
  • Beam: 46’
  • Displacement: 3,954 tons

Propulsion: 2 cylinder back-acting engine, single screw, square rigged sails

Armament: 21 guns: Two (2) 100-Pounder Muzzle Loading Rifled Gun; One (1) 60-Pounder Muzzle Loading Rifled Guns; Two (2) 20-Pounder Muzzle Loading Rifled Guns; Sixteen (16) 9” Smooth Bore Guns

Crew Compliment: 325

Service History:

  • Served in Asiatic Squadron 1867-1870
  • Vessel named Delaware in 1869
  • Decommissioned December 5, 1870
  • Foundered at wharf 1877
  • Sold out of service in 1877 and broken up 

U.S.S. Delaware, BB-28

United States Navy, Fleet Service, World War I                                          

First of the Dreadnoughts in U.S. Navy, Delaware Class;
Only two vessels in this class, Delaware and North Dakota.

Construction:

  • Built by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company
  • Laid down November 11, 1907
  • Launched February 6, 1909
  • Commissioned April 4, 1910

Dimensions:

  • Length: 518’ 9”
  • Beam: 85’ 3”
  • Displacement: 22,000 tons (full load)

Propulsion: 4 Cylinder Triple Expansion, Reciprocating Engines, 25,000 horsepower, First ship to have forced-lubrication system for engines.

Armament: Ten (10) 12” guns in turrets with smaller 5” guns; Two (2) 21” submerged torpedo tubes; Defensive armaments included armored turrets, splinter-proof ventilators and uptakes, and an armor belt on hull that was 7-8’ in height, and 11” in thickness.

Crew Compliment: 1384 (war service)

Service History:

  • October 3-10, 1910 at Wilmington, Delaware
  • Cruised to England and France and participated in fleet exercises 1910-1913
  • Positioned off of Vera Cruz, Mexico during disturbances 1914-1915
  • With the U.S. Battleship Division Nine and joined with British Grand Fleet at Scapa Flow in 1917
  • Remained with British Grand Fleet, evaded U-Boat attack off Norway and served on convoy escort duty, returned to U.S. in 1918
  • With the Atlantic Fleet cruises and midshipmen training cruises 1918-1923
  • Participated in joint Army-Navy testing to determine value of aerial bombing against naval vessels in 1921
  • Decommissioned November 10, 1923; stripped of war capability and scrapped February 5, 1924 in accordance with the Washington Naval Treaty of February 8, 1922